Халаты. Артефакты XIII-XIV вв.

Средневековый костюм народов Средней Азии, Персии, Золотой Орды и Малой Азии
Аватара пользователя
Timurid
Site Admin
Сообщения: 1507
Зарегистрирован: 16 ноя 2007, 22:18
Ваши интересы в истории: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Чем вам интересен форум: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Откуда: Киев, Украина
Контактная информация:

Халаты. Артефакты XIII-XIV вв.

Сообщение Timurid » 11 янв 2008, 19:04

Eastern Iran or Central Asia, late 13th or first half 14th century
he description supplied by Christies was as follows:

A MONGOL SILK LAMPAS WEAVE ROBE
Eastern Iran or Central Asia, late 13th or first half 14th century The silk woven with an intricate design of interlaced strapwork overlaid by roundels enclosing cusped oval panels of dense floral motifs around similar plainer medallions, changing on the shoulders to a design more closely imitating knotted kufic inscriptions, applied lapel panel around the collar, the waist with applied band of braiding tying at the side with ribbons, a few areas of restoration. 51½in. (131cm.) high.

This is one of the most complete Mongol robes to have been discovered to date. It is enormously informative as to the precise method of construction of the robe; the way the belt panel is applied over the gathered ground material and tied at the side, and the way the skirt is pleated along the upper edge. Other fragmentary robes have appeared on the market, in less complete form.

It demonstrates clearly the positioning of the different patterning in the material. The original material was woven, like a number of contemporaneous textiles, with a band of decoration along one side which was originally based on the idea of a kufic inscription. This has been used in this robe along the shoulders. It has not been used, in contrast to what one might have predicted, across the upper arms, in the position where tiraz bands are frequently depicted in miniatures.

A number of scholars have written recently on the subject of Mongol silks (particularly Wardwell, Anne E.: "Panni Tartarici: Eastern Islamic Silks woven with Gold and Silver, 13th and 14th Centuries" Islamic Art, III, New York, 1989, pp.95-173; and Watt, James C.Y. and Wardwell, Anne E.: When Silk was Gold: Central Asian and Chinese Textiles, exhibition catalogue, New York, 1997). This is in part due to the number which have come onto the market recently with a Tibetan provenance. Studies have concentrated on the structure and on the origin of the designs. Origins have been suggested from very widely varying regions; there seems little hard fact on which to base an opinion. In one discussion of the group in the David Collection, Copenhagen, many pages are spent going through the various points at the end of which the author admits it is difficult to draw a conclusion as to which precise weaving centre produces each design and technique (Folsach, Kjeld v. and Klebow Bernsted, Anne-Marie: Woven Treasures - Textiles from the World of Islam, Copenhagen, 1993, pp.44-64).

The main feature of the design of the present textile is the continuous interlaced strapwork; in contrast to most of the other textiles the borders have taken centre stage, dwarfing the motifs in the middle of the medallions. The idea of linked border strapwork is frequently found in the Islamic world, notably in some of the metalwork of the 12th and 13th centuries. Like so many other of the textiles acknowledged to be related, this shows a combination of influences: Islamic borders enclose medallions which on their own would be more Chinese in feel (for earlier similar Chinese medallions see Watt and Wardwell, op.cit, no.33, pp.122-3). It is interesting to compare Ming Dynasty robes such as that excavated in Zou Xian County, catalogue number 277, Chinese Costumes, Part II, 5000 Years of Chinese Art, published by the Editorial Committee of '5000 Years of Chinese Art', Beijing.

This robe has an added feature noted in a number of the Islamic Mongol lampas weave textiles: running along the upper edge of each panel is a separate design originally loosely based on kufic calligraphy. In the present textile , as also evidenced in the field, the designer must have been fascinated with interlace patterns and has allowed central knots on the verticals to take over.
329.jpg
329.jpg (22.69 КБ) 9498 просмотров
328.jpg
328.jpg (23.99 КБ) 9505 просмотров
327.jpg
327.jpg (20.69 КБ) 9490 просмотров
326.jpg
"По крупицам, по крохам собираем былое,
Справедливым ножом отрезаем гнилое.
Вековую завесу срываем своими руками!"(с)КМ

Аватара пользователя
Timurid
Site Admin
Сообщения: 1507
Зарегистрирован: 16 ноя 2007, 22:18
Ваши интересы в истории: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Чем вам интересен форум: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Откуда: Киев, Украина
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Timurid » 11 янв 2008, 19:06

Robe, Mongolian, 13th - 14th century
Found at the Onggut tomb site
Silk with gold brocade
142 x 246 cm

This robe, made from yellow silk embroidered with gold thread, was found in the Onggut tomb site a Dasujixiang Mingshui, Daerhanmao Mingan United Banner. The tomb was excavated in 1978, uncovering a number of silk garments in a marvelous state of preservation. In 1970 a similar robe was found at the Yanhu site in the Tianshan Mountains; this fact, along with the knowledge that the Uighur peoples of Yanhu were famous for their gold brocade work, has led some experts to suggest this robe is of Uighur manufacture.1

The design decorating the lining, however, is probably of Iranian origin. As can be seen in the detail view, the brocade is worked into the figures of two rampant lions wearing crowns, surrounded by patterns of flowers and vines. This may have been inspired by the images of rearing lions depicted in scenes of royal hunts, a motif (along with the vines and flowers) commonly reproduced in Sassanian brocades and silver vessels.

(1) Adam T. Kessler, Empires Beyond the Great Wall: The Heritage of Genghis Khan (Los Angeles: Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 1993), pp. 160-1.
331.jpg
330.jpg
"По крупицам, по крохам собираем былое,
Справедливым ножом отрезаем гнилое.
Вековую завесу срываем своими руками!"(с)КМ

Yuriy
Свой человек
Сообщения: 661
Зарегистрирован: 11 янв 2008, 18:25
Откуда: Москва РФ
Благодарил (а): 12 раз
Поблагодарили: 14 раз

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Yuriy » 12 янв 2008, 22:48

Дим, на старом (первой версии) форуме выкладывались подобные халаты, это те же?

Аватара пользователя
Timurid
Site Admin
Сообщения: 1507
Зарегистрирован: 16 ноя 2007, 22:18
Ваши интересы в истории: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Чем вам интересен форум: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Откуда: Киев, Украина
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Timurid » 13 янв 2008, 00:32

Юр, да, это таже самая тема, я ее нашел в архивах.
"По крупицам, по крохам собираем былое,
Справедливым ножом отрезаем гнилое.
Вековую завесу срываем своими руками!"(с)КМ

Аватара пользователя
Lyho
Свой человек
Сообщения: 188
Зарегистрирован: 09 дек 2007, 22:45
Откуда: Київ.

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Lyho » 25 янв 2008, 14:29

А вопрос вот какой (может быть слегка не в тему данного обсуждения ), если не ошибаюсь, именно монголы восприняли от китайцев застегивание кафтанов направо, чем и отличались от других народов. В ЗО значительную часть населения составляли покоренные народы. Переняли ли они правый запах кафтанов или следовали своим традиционным нормам в костюме? Можно ли считать правый запах кафтанов - чертой присущей монгольской верхуше общества ЗО?
Как обстояло дело у народов населявших гос-во тимуридов?
Ничто не портит цель так как прямое попадание. (с) Морской юмор.

Аватара пользователя
Timurid
Site Admin
Сообщения: 1507
Зарегистрирован: 16 ноя 2007, 22:18
Ваши интересы в истории: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Чем вам интересен форум: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Откуда: Киев, Украина
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Timurid » 25 янв 2008, 14:39

Бытует мнение, что на всей территории монгольских государств бытовала обще Имперская мода. Наверняка знать и воинское сословие, в том числе местная, были подвержены этой моде в первую очередь. Что касается местного населения, то на примере державы Тимуридов, могу сказать, что в большинстве своем носили то же самое что и до завоевания, хотя, то тут, то там в источниках все же всплывают тюрко-монгольские элементы среди местного население. Т.е., мое мнение, что имперская мода на местное население тоже имела влияние, но значительно в меньшей степени, нежели на высшее сословие.
Что касается запаха, то например правый запах встречался и у древних тюрков (статья на Асгарде), так что, как версия, не обязательно монголы переняли его у китайцев.
"По крупицам, по крохам собираем былое,
Справедливым ножом отрезаем гнилое.
Вековую завесу срываем своими руками!"(с)КМ

Аватара пользователя
Тэль
Гюзель
Сообщения: 58
Зарегистрирован: 09 дек 2007, 13:42
Откуда: Ростов-на-Дону
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Тэль » 31 янв 2008, 13:49

UPD: запах _слева направо_является этносоциальным признаком монгольского этноса. Мы сейчас говорим о халатах, когда имеется непосредственно запах (опять таки монгольский этнопризнак), а не о кафтанах, которые застегиваются встык (будучи привнесенными тюрскими элементами и веяниями исламской моды,а не китайской)
Такие халаты — Новопавловск, Увек, Маячный Ьугор, вспомню еще добавлю.

А вот на найденных кафтанах пуговицы находятся на левой поле, т.е. правая оказывается поверх левой.
Последний раз редактировалось Тэль 18 фев 2008, 00:55, всего редактировалось 2 раза.
Я нравлюсь Вам? У Вас хороший вкус" © О. Арефьева

Аватара пользователя
Timurid
Site Admin
Сообщения: 1507
Зарегистрирован: 16 ноя 2007, 22:18
Ваши интересы в истории: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Чем вам интересен форум: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Откуда: Киев, Украина
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Timurid » 31 янв 2008, 13:54

:shock:
Тэль, + 1 за внимательность!
"По крупицам, по крохам собираем былое,
Справедливым ножом отрезаем гнилое.
Вековую завесу срываем своими руками!"(с)КМ

Аватара пользователя
Тэль
Гюзель
Сообщения: 58
Зарегистрирован: 09 дек 2007, 13:42
Откуда: Ростов-на-Дону
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Тэль » 31 янв 2008, 14:25

Lyho, вообще запах очень сильно варьируется по регионам. И "даже в пределах одного захоронения" (Доде, 2007) Половцы, например, имеют все-таки свой, UPD: левый запах.

Кто их знает, что они переняли :roll:
Это как закон такой (Мерфи или как точнее): находят костюм в могильнике, и по этносоциальным признакам определяют этнос. А не наоборот)) Вроде как "нужное находится в последнюю очередь" :)

Короче, я бы ответила: "Переняли ли они правый запах кафтанов или следовали своим традиционным нормам в костюме? — Нет, следовали."
Я нравлюсь Вам? У Вас хороший вкус" © О. Арефьева

Аватара пользователя
Тэль
Гюзель
Сообщения: 58
Зарегистрирован: 09 дек 2007, 13:42
Откуда: Ростов-на-Дону
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Тэль » 18 фев 2008, 01:14

Ребята, у меня сейчас на ночь глядя мозг взорвался :mrgreen:Посмейтесь, пожалуйста, вместе со мной, и простите, если кто окончательно запутался из-за всего написанного ранее и сейчас.

Доде в обеих своих работах объясняет ПРАВЫЙ монгольский запах как наложение левой полы на правую, запах слева направо.
А исследователи этих же, считай, халатов, из ГИМа называют наложение левой полы на правую, запах слева направо — ЛЕВЫМ.
Завтра прочитаю заново все книжки :evil: и составлю таблицу, как в каждой книге трактуется термин :twisted:
Я нравлюсь Вам? У Вас хороший вкус" © О. Арефьева

Аватара пользователя
Timurid
Site Admin
Сообщения: 1507
Зарегистрирован: 16 ноя 2007, 22:18
Ваши интересы в истории: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Чем вам интересен форум: ЗО, СА, Персия 14-15 века; реестровое казачество 17 века.
Откуда: Киев, Украина
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Timurid » 04 июн 2008, 20:47

halat.jpg
halat2.jpg
Aga Khan Museum Collection, фотки я так понимаю с лондоской выставки 2007г. подпись под халатом: Mongol robe, likely to have originated in Central Asia in the late 13th or early 14th century © The Aga Khan Trust for Culture.
"По крупицам, по крохам собираем былое,
Справедливым ножом отрезаем гнилое.
Вековую завесу срываем своими руками!"(с)КМ

Аватара пользователя
Scany
Гость
Сообщения: 2
Зарегистрирован: 09 июн 2008, 14:04
Откуда: Северная Столица
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Scany » 16 июл 2008, 23:48

Я, конечно, могу и ошибиццо, но по ходу все картинки, кроме второй сверху - это фотографии одного и того же халата. Очень уж характерная полоса на плечах с подозрительно одинаковым перекосом...
Я - Солнце. Бывает, как засвечу...

Аватара пользователя
Denis
Модератор
Сообщения: 1179
Зарегистрирован: 19 ноя 2007, 14:34
Ваши интересы в истории: ЗО, ногайские татары 17в.
Чем вам интересен форум: его неповторимая полезность
Откуда: Киев
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Denis » 17 июл 2008, 10:14

Я, конечно, могу и ошибиццо, но по ходу все картинки, кроме второй сверху - это фотографии одного и того же халата. Очень уж характерная полоса на плечах с подозрительно одинаковым перекосом...
салям, халаты разные, в сети есть по нескольку фот каждого из них с нескольких строн и фрагментами.. в свое время все это было в недрах "ордынского "форума и по трагической случайности накрылось медным тазом.. вот Димон пытаецо вернуть как было:)

такого вроде еще не было:
http://www.asianart.com/rossi/gallery5/10.html
foto_009.jpg
This very typical Mongolian robe of the Yuan dynasty has a flat crossing collar, narrow sleeves and waist and silk tying ribbons. It is 126 centimetres in length, 218 centimetres across the sleeves, 110 centimetres wide at the robe’s skirt and 49 centimetres at the waist The collar is 7.2 centimetres wide. Eighteen silk ribbons with a width of 0.7 centimetres have been stitched horizontally around the waist to form a broad band some 18.5 centimetres in width, which visually is not unlike the modern cummerbund. This kind of waist decoration composed of silk ribbons has so far not been found on other Yuan robes. Made of the same silk damask as the robe’s exterior layer, each ribbon is knotted three times, in the middle of the waist, front and back, and at the wearer’s right side, where are also located seven knotted buttons which are secured by corresponding loops located also to wearer’s right at the waist. A ribbon of the same silk tabby as the robe’s lining hangs under the left arm. At 19 centimetres in length and 2.5 centimetres in width, it would have been secured to another silk ribbon that was once connected to the inner panel of the robe.

Although of the same material as the top of the robe, the garment’s skirt is, in fact, composed of two separate pieces of fabric. The two panels, both about 64 centimetres in length, have different widths of 129 and 187 centimetres. At the top of both panels, and therefore just below the ribboned waist, the material has been folded over and stitched into tight, tiny pleats, numbering altogether 153. At the back of the skirt to the wearer’s left is a riding vent of some 19 centimetres of overlapping material.

The lining layer of the robe is of silk tabby, with a similar layout to the exterior, but with fewer and looser pleats. A reconstruction of the tailoring pattern for the exterior layer suggests this robe would have required 7.5 metres of silk.

The exterior layer of the robe is a twill damask, 1/2S twill on 2/1Z twill, with motifs of flying birds and small flowers, which is repeated in 7 centimetre units in both warp and weft directions and in a very similar style to that of the robe with ‘all weather’ sleeves. Twill damask, especially using 2/1 and 1/2 in different directions, was a very popular combination of pattern and ground weaves in the Yuan period. Many fragments with this weave structure have been found, two good examples being a pair of patchwork textiles from the Dove Cave at Longhua (Hebei). One had seven of its seventeen parts using this weave structure, and the other had four of its twelve patches utilising this weave.

Аватара пользователя
Denis
Модератор
Сообщения: 1179
Зарегистрирован: 19 ноя 2007, 14:34
Ваши интересы в истории: ЗО, ногайские татары 17в.
Чем вам интересен форум: его неповторимая полезность
Откуда: Киев
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Denis » 17 июл 2008, 10:17

http://www.asianart.com/rossi/gallery5/11.html
foto_010.jpg
In Yuan dynasty documents, one of the most common types of ceremonial robe was the bian xian ao or bian xian pao. Ao and pao are alternative words for ‘robe’, but bian means ‘braid’ while xian means ‘threads’, thus ‘braided thread robe’. The present robe is one of the best extant examples of such a garment, the silk braiding being implemented in the cummerbund-like waist decoration, which in the robe in Plate IX is composed of ribbons. Curiously enough, the couched pairs of silk threads filling the band at the waist give the effect of braided cords, without actually being braided.

In each pair, one thread has been plied with two S twisted silk yarns into Z direction, and the other with two Z twisted yarns plied into S direction, and thus the effect is achieved.

There are in total 97 pairs of silk ‘braids’ in the waist area, giving it a width of 24.5 centimetres. This same technique for a braided effect can be widely found on robes from other Yuan excavations. One good example is a nasji robe from Mingshui (Inner Mongolia) in the collection of the Museum of Mongol Art, Hohhot.

The robe is 123 centimetres in length, 202 centimetres in width across the sleeves, and 46 centimetres in width at the waist. Its front panel opens to the right with five ribbons of purple complex gauze, each 2.8 centimetres wide and 24 centimetres long, which, when tied to five other purple gauze ribbons on the right waist, secured the robe. On the inside panel, a silk tabby ribbon, 2.5 centimetres by 9 centimetres, would have been tied to a now-lost ribbon on the underside of the left arm.

Like the robe in Plate IX, the top of the robe and the skirt are separate pieces of fabric, the skirt being composed of two panels. Since the textile used for the front panel of the robe is somewhat wider than other comparable examples for this type of robe, the tailoring method is therefore slightly different. The panels of the skirt are also much wider than in comparable robes, and with many more pleats stitched into the border at the waist – in total 224 pleats, each three centimetres in length. The flat, overlapping collar is 7 centimetres wide, and the border around the hem of the skirt originally had a layer composed of feathers, but that has now almost completely disappeared leaving a silk tabby base between four and six centimetres in width.

The same silk tabby composes the fabric for the robe’s lining, but the exterior layer of the robe is the so-called nasji, in which lampas is used as the basic weave structure and gold threads for the patterning wefts. So on this textile, two sets of warps – a foundation warp and a binding warp – were woven with two sets of wefts – a foundation weft made of silk and supplementary wefts made of gold-wrapped threads – to form a foundation weave in ribbed tabby and a binding weave in 1/3Z twill. The woven pattern employs small hexagons as a ground and tear-shaped lobed roundels enclosing running deer as the main motif, one row of deer running leftwards and the other row running rightwards. Based on analysis of the fabric, the loom width would have been about 88 centimetres, including eight repeats of the tear-shaped roundels.

This shape of roundel was popular during the Yuan dynasty, as was the use of deer as decorative motifs.

On the shoulder is a band some 14.5 centimetres long bearing a pattern with a strong Islamic flavour, and is possibly a design in pseudo Kufic script. Similar patterns have been found on other Mongol robes and textiles, such as a Mingshui nasji robe and other textile fragments from this region. This kind of band decoration, in fact, dates back at least to the Jin dynasty (1115-1234) as attested by an excavated robe with bands in gold brocade on the shoulder, sleeves and lower section of the skirt.

The cuffs of the sleeves are also of gilt fabric, being adorned with a diamond-shaped grid, each of the diamonds containing a rosette at its centre. This is also a very common pattern in Yuan dynasty textiles and can be found on such pieces such as the patchwork from the Dove Cave at Longhua (Hebei). However, the weave structure is very unusual – there are no binding warps. One reason for this might be that the minuteness of the pattern and shortness of the gold threads on the face meant that a special binding warp was not necessary, but instead utilised the pairs of foundation warps to bind the gold threads.

Аватара пользователя
Denis
Модератор
Сообщения: 1179
Зарегистрирован: 19 ноя 2007, 14:34
Ваши интересы в истории: ЗО, ногайские татары 17в.
Чем вам интересен форум: его неповторимая полезность
Откуда: Киев
Контактная информация:

Re: Халаты. Артефакты 13-14 веков.

Сообщение Denis » 17 июл 2008, 14:38

ниже халат от "Genghis Khan Exhibits, Inc и министерства культуры Монголии":) экспонат исторического музея Уланбатора, выставка посвящена Ченгиз Хану (участвовало 15 музеев, в том числе и Эрмитаж)
006.jpg

Ответить